Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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Date Name Information
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt The CWGC record Fusilier Andrew Artt as the son of Andrew and Maria Patterson Artt. He is listed as the husband of Elizabeth Murray Artt of Cookstown. It also records that he served in the 1914-18 War.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Fusilier Andrew Artt is commemorated on Cookstown Cenotaph.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Fusilier Artt is buried in Cookstown New Cemetery.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Fusilier Andrew Artt was serving with the 5th Battalion of the Royal Irish Fusiliers when died at home on 1st November 1941, aged 51, of tuberculosis.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt After the war, Andrew Artt worked as a locomotive fireman, an assistant to the engine driver. He worked on the rail line that ran between Cookstown and Coleraine.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Sapper Andrew Artt served with the Royal Engineers in World War One and was wounded in action. He had the Service Numbers 196931 and WR/552519.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Andrew Artt and Elizabeth Murray were married on 27th February 1914 in the district of Carrickfergus. It is believed they had one daughter.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt The 1911 census lists Andrew as age 20 living with his father and step mother Matilda at house 11 in Cloghog, Moneyhaw. Andrew was an engine cleaner. His father was a general labourer.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Andrew’s father remarried in 1908. Andrew Artt (senior) married Matilda Patterson on 14th March 1908. It might well be that Maria and Matilda were sisters.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt The 1901 census lists Andrew as age 10 living with the family at house 10 in Cloghog, Moneyhaw, County Londonderry. His father, now a widower, was a coachman and a domestic servant.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt His elder brother Charles died on 3rd February 1901 in Moneymore, aged 19.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt It seems his mother, Maria Artt, died just a year after he was born on 21st December 1892 in the Moneymore area.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Family: Andrew Artt, Maria Artt, Charles Artt (born 30th August 1881, Coagh; died 3rd February 1901, Moneymore), Mary Minnie Artt (born 3rd February 1883, Moneymore), William Artt (born 1st August 1887, Coagh), Andrew Artt (born 1st September 1891, Moneymore).
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Andrew Artt was born on 1st September 1891 in the Moneymore area. He was the youngest of four children.
30/12/2018 Fusilier Andrew Artt Andrew Artt was the son of Andrew and Maria Artt. Andrew Artt and Maria Patterson were married on 8th November 1880 in the district of Cookstown.
28/12/2018 Pte. John Patrick Tohill TOHILL – Second anniversary. In loving memory of John P Tohill, killed in action at Albert, France on 26th January 1916. R.I.P.
28/12/2018 Pte. John Patrick Tohill 01733
28/12/2018 Pte. John Patrick Tohill From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 26th January 1918:
28/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Mayne Private Joseph Mayne, 6th Connaught Rangers, aged 21 years, youngest son of Mr James Mayne, Tullywiggan, Cookstown. He was engaged in business in Belfast at the commencement of the war, and on the formation of the Irish Brigade, joined the 6th Connaught Rangers in August 1915. He was on active service in France from Christmas following down to the date of his death, on 10th January, and went through all the principal engagements. He was wounded in action on 9th January, and died at the 5th Casualty Clearing Station on the following day, and is interred in the adjoining military cemetery. His elder brother, Mr John Mayne, is with the Medical Department, 9th Infantry, American Army, in France.
28/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Mayne 01732
28/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Mayne From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 26th January 1918: Private Joseph Mayne
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor Inserted by his sorrowing wife and family, Waterloo Terrace, Cookstown.
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor A woman’s part is a broken heart, and the burden of lonely years.’
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor Beneath lies my dear husband, the one we could not save.
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor The moon and stars are shining on sad and lonely grave,
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor Fleeting time will reunite us, thou art only gone before.
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor Oh dear husband, thou hast left us, though we still thy loss deplore,
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor But oh that chain is broken now, a link has gone forever.
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor ‘For many years our family chain was gently linked together;
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor TAYLOR - In loving memory of Sergeant W Taylor, who died 20th January 1915.
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor 01731
28/12/2018 Sgt. William Taylor From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th January 1918:
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. The 1911 census lists Mary Johnston, Matthew’s sister, living with her family in Castledawson Town. The 1911 census lists Rachel Mawhinney, Matthew’s sister, living with her family in Leitrim, Castledawson. Both sisters had sons named Matthew James.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Matthew was living in Desertmartin when he enlisted in Cookstown. He joined the 1st Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers about 1907.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Known family: Matthew McAnary, Jane McAnary, Mary / Bessie McAnary (born 16th August 1872), Annie McAnary (born 18th December 1874), Rachel McAnary (born 21st February 1877), Matthew James McAnary.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Matthew McAnary was born in Desertmartin, County Londonderry.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Matthew James McAnary was the son of Matthew and Jane McAnary. Matthew James McAnary and Jane Palmer were married on 12th November 1869 in the district of Magherafelt.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. This report is remarkable in that both Matthew McAnary and Robert Irwin went on to win Military Medals. Edward Harte’s brother, Jack Harte, also won a Military Medal. All three medal winners died in the war.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. See Magherafelt War Dead for more details on the local memorials.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Private McAnary M.M, is also listed on the Desertmartin Church of Ireland WW1 Roll of Honour
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Inserted by his loving sister and brother-in-law, Rachel and David Mawhinney, Leitrim, Castledawson.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. ‘He did his duty.’
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Only that he did his duty, died bravely as he fought.'
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. How his life was sped we know not, what the last word, look or thought,
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. But while life and memory last, we will remember thee.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. A lonely grave in a foreign land, a grave we may never see,
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. His battle fought, his name enrolled, on the scroll of the deathless brave.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. ‘In a distant land he lies, at rest in a soldier’s grave
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. 01730
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th January 1918: McANARY
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Inserted by his loving nephew, Matthew James Johnston
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Be laid in a soldier’s grave.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. We little thought, how soon he would,
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. He looked so strong and brave
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. ‘When last we saw him smiling
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. 01729
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th January 1918: McANARY
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Corporal M J McAnary, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, Leitrim, Castledawson, killed.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. 01052
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. From the Belfast Newsletter dated 12th January 1918:
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Inserted by his loving sister and brother-in-law, Mary and Joseph Johnston, Leitrim, Castledawson.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Far away from those he loved, in a hero’s grave he lies.’
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. He sleeps not in his native land, but under foreign skies.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Yet deep within our hearts, our memory we will keep,
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. We think of him in silence, no eyes may see us weep,
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. To cheer his last moments or point him above.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. No parting farewell, no kind word of love,
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. To hear his last word or dry his last hair;
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. ‘He is gone, Oh how hard not a friend to be near,
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. McANARY – Killed in action in France 30th November 1917, Private Matthew James McAnary, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. 01728
28/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th January 1918:
28/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Mayne MAYNE – 10th January, at a Casualty Clearing Station in France, from wounds received in action on the previous day, Private Joseph Mayne, 6th Connaught Rangers, youngest son of James Mayne, Tullywiggan, Cookstown. R.I.P.
28/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Mayne 01727
28/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Mayne From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th January 1918:
27/12/2018 Pte. James Nelson In the official list of casualties issued a few days ago appears the following Cookstown names, all of the Royal Inniskillings:- H Leonard, who belongs to Ardtrea; T Maguire, Millburn Street, Cookstown; T Nelson, Cookstown; F S Telford, Cookstown. Nelson is in hospital in Dublin and he and all the others are reported to be making favourable progress towards recovery.
27/12/2018 Pte. James Nelson 01726
27/12/2018 Pte. James Nelson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th January 1918: Thomas Nelson (brother of James Nelson)
27/12/2018 Pte. Matthew Hagan Trooper M Hagan, North Irish Horse, spent the week in Coagh before going out with a draft from Antrim Camp, which left for Egypt on Tuesday.
27/12/2018 Pte. Matthew Hagan 01725
27/12/2018 Pte. Matthew Hagan From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th January 1918: Coagh
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh At the Cookstown Branch of the Irish National Foresters on Sunday evening, Brother John Hagan, S.C.R., presiding, the following resolution was, on the motion of Brother P McLarnon, seconded by Brother Joseph Crilly, passed in silence, the embers standing:- ‘That we have learned with regret of the death of Lieutenant William J McVeagh, and we hereby tender to his father, Brother James McVeagh and other relatives, our deepest sympathy in their sad bereavement.’
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh 01724
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 12th January 1918:
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh Lieutenant W J McVeagh, Royal Munster Fusiliers, Machine Gun Section (son of Mr James McVeagh, Loy Hill, Cookstown), was killed in action in Palestine on 28th December. Lieutenant McVeagh was a past student of St Mary’s College, Dundalk, and was an undergraduate of the National University, Dublin. After five months training as a cadet, he was gazette second lieutenant in March 1915. He saw a great deal of active service on the western front, and was three times wounded. Last March he was gazette lieutenant and went to Salonika, and has been serving in Egypt and Palestine. His parents have the sincere sympathy of all their townspeople on the death of their gallant son, who not only risked his life for the Empire, but died as many a crusader wished to do long ago, in a successful attempt to free the Holy land from Muslim rule.
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh 01723
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th January 1918: Lieutenant W J McVeagh
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh McVEAGH – Killed in action in Palestine on 28th December, Lieutenant W J McVeagh, Royal Munster Fusiliers, son of James McVeagh, Loy Hill, Cookstown. R.I.P. Deeply regretted. Sacred Heart of Jesus, have mercy on his soul.
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh 01722
27/12/2018 Lieut William John McVeagh From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th January 1918:
26/12/2018 Pte. Alexander Martin Official news has been received that Private Alex Martin, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (formerly North Irish Horse), was killed in action on 20th November. The deceased was the fifth son of Mr James Martin, Killycolpy, Stewartstown, County Tyrone, and nephew of Mrs Straghan, 14 Cromwell Street, Belfast. Private Martin enlisted with the North Irish Horse on 25th May 1915, was transferred to the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, and went overseas on 9th January 1916. Prior to enlistment he was in the employment of Messrs Renwick, Robinson & Co, Belfast. One of the deceased’s brothers was wounded on 16th August last, which another is at present serving with His Majesty’s Navy. The deceased was Worshipful Master of Magdalene Church Defenders’ Temperance L.O.L. 615, a member of R.B.P. 12, and South Belfast Regiment, U.V.F.
26/12/2018 Pte. Alexander Martin 01721
26/12/2018 Pte. Alexander Martin From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th January 1918: Private Alex Martin
26/12/2018 Pte. John Jordan James Bell, water bailiff, Moneymore, charged Trooper William Jordan, North Irish Horse, Doneybraggy, with assault on 7th December. Complainant said the defendant was with an escort at the time, and called complainant over to say goodbye. Bell went over with outstretched hand, when Jordan struck him a violent blow on the eye. Mr Andrew King said the Court should know that Jordan, who was an absentee from the army at the time, was convicted on Bell’s evidence and fined for poaching. Pretending a forgiving spirit, Jordan induced Bell over to him to say goodbye, and then treacherously struck him. A fine of 10s and costs were imposed by a majority.
26/12/2018 Pte. John Jordan 01720
26/12/2018 Pte. John Jordan From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th January 1918: A Treacherous Soldier (William Jordan – brother of John Jordan)
26/12/2018 Pte. James Mitchell Privates Thomas Creighton, Joseph Curry, James Mitchell, of the Inniskillings, and Trooper Matthew Hagan and Thomas Collins, North Irish Horse, spent Christmas with their friends at Coagh.
26/12/2018 Pte. James Mitchell 01719
26/12/2018 Pte. James Mitchell From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th January 1918: Coagh
26/12/2018 Pte. Matthew Hagan Privates Thomas Creighton, Joseph Curry, James Mitchell, of the Inniskillings, and Trooper Matthew Hagan and Thomas Collins, North Irish Horse, spent Christmas with their friends at Coagh.
26/12/2018 Pte. Matthew Hagan 01719
26/12/2018 Pte. Matthew Hagan From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th January 1918: Coagh
26/12/2018 Pte. William Clark Deeply regretted by his grandmother, aunts and nephews, Oldtown Street, Cookstown.
26/12/2018 Pte. William Clark His resting place a soldier’s grave.’
26/12/2018 Pte. William Clark His heart was kind, his spirit brave,
26/12/2018 Pte. William Clark And gave his life to save us all.
26/12/2018 Pte. William Clark ‘He proudly answered his country’s call
26/12/2018 Pte. William Clark CLARKE – In affectionate remembrance of William John Clarke No 20760, C Company, Machine Gun Section, 6/7 Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers, 15th Division, British Expeditionary Force, killed in action in France on 27th December 1916.
26/12/2018 Pte. William Clark 01718
26/12/2018 Pte. William Clark From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th January 1918:
23/12/2018 Sgt. William Neill Private William Neill, of the Inniskillings, whose parents reside at Millburn Street, Cookstown, is home on a few days’ furlough. He joined the Inniskillings between four and five years ago, when only a lad, and was with the 3rd Battalion in Londonderry at the beginning of the war. He volunteered for active service and went with the 1st Battalion to Gallipoli, where for six months he was in the thick of the fighting. He had some thrilling experiences and narrow escapes. He was once slightly wounded, and on another occasion a bullet passed through his helmet, quite close to his head. His most trying time was at Chocolate Hill, but he does not care to give any details. He was invalided home suffering from rheumatism, but is now quite recovered and is in good health and spirits. At the expiration of his furlough he goes back to Londonderry for a time.
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23/12/2018 Sgt. William Neill From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th December 1915: Home on Furlough
22/12/2018 Pte. James Herbert Clarke Private Charles Stevenson, Royal Irish Rifles, whose parents reside in Milburn Street, Cookstown, has been recently home on a short furlough after twelve months in France. He was a reservist and had gone to Canada only a couple of months prior to the outbreak of hostilities. He at once returned to the colours. He was sent out with his regiment and was only there a few days when he was wounded at Mons. On recovery he was stationed in Dublin, but again volunteered for the front, and during the past year he has been in the thick of it. He was looking fit and well when home, and has gone back to the fighting line. He brought a German watch as a memento to his father, which he had picked up on the field. His sister is the widow of the late Lance Corporal James H Clarke, of the Inniskillings, a native of Coleraine, who was mortally wounded in action on 8th November of last year.
22/12/2018 Pte. James Herbert Clarke 01716
22/12/2018 Pte. James Herbert Clarke From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th December 1915: Private Charles Stevenson (brother-in-law of James Herbert Clarke)
22/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Newell Sergeant James Newell, son of Mrs Newell, North Street, Stewartstown, who has been home on a few days leave from the front, after been fifteen months there, and was through all the principal engagements, was promoted on the field. After re-joining his unit, he was again promoted to Staff sergeant and pay. Previous to joining the above corps he was corporal in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, and forfeited his rank to join the Army Veterinary Corps as private. Owing to success in all exams, he gained the above rank. He had four brothers in the Army, two killed some time past and one wounded.
22/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Newell 01715
22/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Newell From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th December 1915: Stewartstown
22/12/2018 Pte. Robert Howe Sergeant R Howe and Private J Shaw, both belonging to the 34th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, hailing from London, Ontario, Canada, and at present at training at Bramsholt Camp, near Liphook, Hants, England, paid a four day visit last week to Mrs Howe. They are both in the best of health and spirits and seem to enjoy a soldier’s life. He was in Canada at the beginning of hostilities, and very pluckily joined the colours, soon after which he became sergeant. His many friends in Coagh wish him success.
22/12/2018 Pte. Robert Howe 01714
22/12/2018 Pte. Robert Howe From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th December 1915: Coagh
22/12/2018 L/Sgt George Adams Henry M.M. Trooper George A Henry, son of Mr William James Henry, Cloghog, has arrived home for a few days from France. He is looking fit and has increased considerably in weight since his last visit some seven or eight months ago. He has been engaged on the bodyguard of the Commander in Chief, with a number of other troopers of the North Irish Horse, their duties being military police work, carrying despatches and conducting German prisoners back from behind the firing line. Some of the North Irish Horse are doing their turn in the trenches, but Trooper Henry has not yet had the privilege. One of his companions, Trooper Sam Espey, has at his own request, being engaged in the trenches fir a considerable time.
22/12/2018 L/Sgt George Adams Henry M.M. 01713
22/12/2018 L/Sgt George Adams Henry M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th December 1915: Trooper Henry Home
21/12/2018 Corp William Nathaniel Thom Mr Thom, in replying, thanked the rector and parishioners for their beautiful and costly gifts; also for the loyal support they had generously given him during his curacy. He thanked his fellow curate, Rev P Colthurst, B.A., who had refused a more lucrative position, to allow him to go forward to help the ‘noble boys’ he loved so well. He also paid tribute to his mother, who although she had one son in France already, unselfishly yielded to his earnest desire to do his bit for his country and for his God. The singing of the National Anthem concluded this loving and sorrowful goodbye.
21/12/2018 Corp William Nathaniel Thom Mr Walsh, on behalf of the church wardens, expressed the good wishes of St Catherine’s parish, and Mr Marshall and others spoke in the highest terms of his kind, energetic and cheerful manner.
21/12/2018 Corp William Nathaniel Thom Rev H W B Thompson, B.D., rector of the parish, took the chair, and in making the presentation, which consisted in a gold illuminated wristlet watch and cheque, desired Mr Thom to bear in mind always that he brought with him the sincere goodwill of all the people in St Catherine’s parish. All appreciated the unselfish work which Mr Thom carried out during his three years of life in the parish, and wished him God-speed in the noble work he was now undertaking.
21/12/2018 Corp William Nathaniel Thom On Monday evening, 30th November, an interesting and pleasant ceremony took place in St Catherine’s School, Donore Avenue, Dublin, under the auspices of the Christian Association, in the form of a presentation to the Rev J Thom, M.A., C.F., on the occasion of his departure to take up duties as chaplain to his Majesty’s Forces in France.
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21/12/2018 Corp William Nathaniel Thom From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915: Presentation to Rev John Thom M.A.
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart His Lordship’s only daughter, Lady Katherine Stuart, was also an active worker in connection with the Princess Mary’s Fund, till laid up with a severe illness from which she is now happily recovering.
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart But although the Countess is unable to assist in war work, her daughter-in-law (who, if her husband is fortunately as prisoner of war, is now Viscountess Stuart), is a Red Cross and V.A.D. nurse, and in spite of her anxiety as to her husband’s fate, she has obtained an appointment on the staff of St Mary’s Hospital, just opened.
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart Her father, Major General Arthur Stevens, was in the Indian Army for many years, and was a fine type of Christian soldier. Three brothers of her mother were in the army, Colonel Charles Sheffield Dickson raised and commanded the German legion in the Crimea, another distinguished himself in the Carlist war and the third general served in India, while their father, Major Richard Dickson, 1st Life Guards, died of wounds in the Peninsular war. A generation further back, General Cox, great grandfather of the Countess of Castlestewart, commanded the Guards.
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart His mother, whose health has also suffered from the strain, has had to abandon the many forms of Christian work in which she was engaged, both in India and since her residence in England in order to nurse him, and is living in Surrey for his sake. For the same reason she cannot assist in work for the army, with which her own family have been identified for generations.
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart The youngest son, Charles Patrick, was also a student of great promise, but his health gave way and he is an invalid, unable to take his share in the defence of the Empire to which his brothers have devoted their lives.
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart The third son, Arthur, who is 26 years of age, was educated at Charterhouse, where he was distinguished both at study and games, being in the football eleven and obtaining a leaving exhibition. He went to Trinity College, Cambridge, and took his degree with honours in the classical tripos. He completed his education at the Sorbonne, Paris, and accepted a temporary mastership at Rugby where he was when the war broke out. He at once resigned and offered himself to the Public Schools Camp for service, but an attack of illness, consequent of over work at the Sorbonne, compelled him to leave. After a term’s work however, as master at Charterhouse, he again offered himself and joined the 7th Royal Berks Regiment at Reading on Christmas Day 1914, and before going to the front in September, he was appointed brigade machine gun officer. He is now in the Levant with the British columns.
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart 01711
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart ‘I could always depend on him for any work her had to carry out, and throughout the war he has behaved splendidly. I feel I have been deprived of a great friend and good officer, and I cannot afford to lose either without feeling it deeply.’
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart The second son, Robert Sheffield, was a soldier by profession. Educated at Charterhouse, he entered Sandhurst where he was quickly promoted to be colour sergeant, and in 1906, when in his 20th year, was gazetted to the Royal Scots Fusiliers. The regiment was afterwards quartered in Dublin, and here the young lieutenant, a splendid horseman, hunted with the Ward, Meath and Kildare Hunts, rode at Fairyhouse and Punchestown, and played polo and football for the regiment. When in Dublin he met Constance Evelyn, the youngest daughter of Captain Croker, of the 93rd Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders (who is just now living with the Countess), but they have no family. Though taking part in the lighter side of an officer’s life, he did not neglect serious work, and in 1911 he passed as first class interpreter in French, and the next year went to Russia, becoming a first class interpreter in 1913. He was with the 1st Battalion in South Africa and took part in suppressing the riots in Johannesburg, returning to England in March 1914. When war was declared the Royal Scots Fusiliers were amongst the first in the field, and Captain Stuart took part in the retreat from Mons and fought the battles of the Marne and the Aisne, being mentioned in despatches. In stemming the final attempt of the Germans to get through to Calais on 2nd November 1914, he led a night attack at the head of his company on some German trenches, and it was on the return of the attacking party (who had to retire) that Captain Stuart was reported missing. The Germans had possession of the ground and a search was impossible. It is still hoped that he has been captured, though the name has not been returned by the Germans, and till the war is over, the title to the viscountcy is in abeyance. Colonel Douglas Smyth, in a letter already published wrote:-
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart His eldest son, Andrew John, also a lover of art and a student of present day questions, was annually the guest of the late Earl and Countess of Castlestewart who, with characteristic thoughtfulness, insisted in his becoming acquainted with Stuart Hall and the state to which, in the course of nature, he would succeed. But at the cll of King and country Viscount Stuart, as he had then become, in the prime of manhood, gave up the bright prospect before him, entered the training camp and died in the trenches at Loos, with his face to the enemy.
21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart In few parts of the United Kingdom have the aristocracy come to the support of the Empire in the hour of danger better than in Tyrone. Almost all the country families have put every man of military age in the fighting line, and those who are too old, with the women, are doing what they can in different ways, to help win the war, irrespective of their personal comfort. In this noble roll of honour the house of Castlestewart, so closely identified with the Cookstown district, holds a high place. The present Earl, eldest son of the Hon the Rev Andrew Stewart (his mother being a daughter of Viscount Powerscourt) succeeded his cousin early in 1914. He had been in the Indian Civil Service for a number of years, but had retired and spent most of his time in travel and in the study of art. Being 74 years of age (he was 13 years of age when his grandfather the 2nd Earl died), he was of course too old for military service. Having been so long in India, he was accustomed to spend the winter in warmer climates than these islands afford, but he volunteered his assistance to the government and he is daily attendance at the War Office, doing what he can to release younger men for active service.
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21/12/2018 Capt Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915:
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart His Lordship’s only daughter, Lady Katherine Stuart, was also an active worker in connection with the Princess Mary’s Fund, till laid up with a severe illness from which she is now happily recovering.
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart But although the Countess is unable to assist in war work, her daughter-in-law (who, if her husband is fortunately as prisoner of war, is now Viscountess Stuart), is a Red Cross and V.A.D. nurse, and in spite of her anxiety as to her husband’s fate, she has obtained an appointment on the staff of St Mary’s Hospital, just opened.
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart Her father, Major General Arthur Stevens, was in the Indian Army for many years, and was a fine type of Christian soldier. Three brothers of her mother were in the army, Colonel Charles Sheffield Dickson raised and commanded the German legion in the Crimea, another distinguished himself in the Carlist war and the third general served in India, while their father, Major Richard Dickson, 1st Life Guards, died of wounds in the Peninsular war. A generation further back, General Cox, great grandfather of the Countess of Castlestewart, commanded the Guards.
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart His mother, whose health has also suffered from the strain, has had to abandon the many forms of Christian work in which she was engaged, both in India and since her residence in England in order to nurse him, and is living in Surrey for his sake. For the same reason she cannot assist in work for the army, with which her own family have been identified for generations.
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart The youngest son, Charles Patrick, was also a student of great promise, but his health gave way and he is an invalid, unable to take his share in the defence of the Empire to which his brothers have devoted their lives.
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart The third son, Arthur, who is 26 years of age, was educated at Charterhouse, where he was distinguished both at study and games, being in the football eleven and obtaining a leaving exhibition. He went to Trinity College, Cambridge, and took his degree with honours in the classical tripos. He completed his education at the Sorbonne, Paris, and accepted a temporary mastership at Rugby where he was when the war broke out. He at once resigned and offered himself to the Public Schools Camp for service, but an attack of illness, consequent of over work at the Sorbonne, compelled him to leave. After a term’s work however, as master at Charterhouse, he again offered himself and joined the 7th Royal Berks Regiment at Reading on Christmas Day 1914, and before going to the front in September, he was appointed brigade machine gun officer. He is now in the Levant with the British columns.
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21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart ‘I could always depend on him for any work her had to carry out, and throughout the war he has behaved splendidly. I feel I have been deprived of a great friend and good officer, and I cannot afford to lose either without feeling it deeply.’
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart The second son, Robert Sheffield, was a soldier by profession. Educated at Charterhouse, he entered Sandhurst where he was quickly promoted to be colour sergeant, and in 1906, when in his 20th year, was gazetted to the Royal Scots Fusiliers. The regiment was afterwards quartered in Dublin, and here the young lieutenant, a splendid horseman, hunted with the Ward, Meath and Kildare Hunts, rode at Fairyhouse and Punchestown, and played polo and football for the regiment. When in Dublin he met Constance Evelyn, the youngest daughter of Captain Croker, of the 93rd Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders (who is just now living with the Countess), but they have no family. Though taking part in the lighter side of an officer’s life, he did not neglect serious work, and in 1911 he passed as first class interpreter in French, and the next year went to Russia, becoming a first class interpreter in 1913. He was with the 1st Battalion in South Africa and took part in suppressing the riots in Johannesburg, returning to England in March 1914. When war was declared the Royal Scots Fusiliers were amongst the first in the field, and Captain Stuart took part in the retreat from Mons and fought the battles of the Marne and the Aisne, being mentioned in despatches. In stemming the final attempt of the Germans to get through to Calais on 2nd November 1914, he led a night attack at the head of his company on some German trenches, and it was on the return of the attacking party (who had to retire) that Captain Stuart was reported missing. The Germans had possession of the ground and a search was impossible. It is still hoped that he has been captured, though the name has not been returned by the Germans, and till the war is over, the title to the viscountcy is in abeyance. Colonel Douglas Smyth, in a letter already published wrote:-
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart His eldest son, Andrew John, also a lover of art and a student of present day questions, was annually the guest of the late Earl and Countess of Castlestewart who, with characteristic thoughtfulness, insisted in his becoming acquainted with Stuart Hall and the state to which, in the course of nature, he would succeed. But at the cll of King and country Viscount Stuart, as he had then become, in the prime of manhood, gave up the bright prospect before him, entered the training camp and died in the trenches at Loos, with his face to the enemy.
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart In few parts of the United Kingdom have the aristocracy come to the support of the Empire in the hour of danger better than in Tyrone. Almost all the country families have put every man of military age in the fighting line, and those who are too old, with the women, are doing what they can in different ways, to help win the war, irrespective of their personal comfort. In this noble roll of honour the house of Castlestewart, so closely identified with the Cookstown district, holds a high place. The present Earl, eldest son of the Hon the Rev Andrew Stewart (his mother being a daughter of Viscount Powerscourt) succeeded his cousin early in 1914. He had been in the Indian Civil Service for a number of years, but had retired and spent most of his time in travel and in the study of art. Being 74 years of age (he was 13 years of age when his grandfather the 2nd Earl died), he was of course too old for military service. Having been so long in India, he was accustomed to spend the winter in warmer climates than these islands afford, but he volunteered his assistance to the government and he is daily attendance at the War Office, doing what he can to release younger men for active service.
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21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915:
21/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Newell Private James Newell, Army Veterinary Corps, son of Mrs William Newell, North Street, Stewartstown (who was home on four days furlough) was last week promoted to the rank and pay of Staff Sergeant on rejoining his regiment. He was corporal in the Inniskilling Fusiliers when he volunteered, through the War Office, and passed their necessary examination, and was promoted on the field. He spent seven months in France and took part in nearly all the big engagements. He is at present on his way to Serbia. He has two brothers, possibly three, in France. Two brothers were killed in action.
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21/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Newell From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915: Promotion (brother of Joseph Newell)
21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart ‘Irish Life’ for 26th November contains another illustrated supplement with portraits of Irishmen who have fallen. Amongst those we notice are Lieutenant Jordan (son of the late Rev Dr Jordan, Magherafelt), Viscount Stewart (son of the Earl of Castlestewart) and Captain A Moutray Read, V.C. (nephew of Mrs Hassard, Desertcreat).
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21/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915:
21/12/2018 Corp Henry McDonald Glasgow Mr Ernest Moore Glasgow, second son of Mr W J Glasgow and Mrs Glasgow of the Post Office, has volunteered for service in the Royal Marine Artillery, and has been sent to Portsmouth for training. He was five years in the Belfast Bank, and was in the Bangor branch recently. He volunteered early in the war but was unable to pass the medical examination. On the second attempt he has been successful. His elder brother, Allan Patterson Glasgow, came from Canada, where he was in the bank, with the 1st Canadian Division and for seven months he has been with the grenade company in the trenches in Flanders or France, while the youngest son, Henry McDonald Glasgow, who held a scholarship in the Royal College of Science, is in the Chemistry Corps of the Royal Engineers, and is for four months at the front. The three brothers therefore (the whole family) have left safe and comfortable jobs to help defend the Empire.
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21/12/2018 Corp Henry McDonald Glasgow From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915: (brother of Henry McDonald Glasgow)
21/12/2018 Pte. Samuel Falls Private Samuel Falls, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, killed in action at Loos on 27th September. His mother, who resides at Blue Doors, Cookstown, received official intimation of his death on Monday last. Private Falls had been working in Scotland at the commencement of the war, hence his joining a Scottish regiment. He was well-known and respected in Cookstown however, where he was brought up with other brothers by his mother, who was left a widow early in life. She is highly respected by all who know her, and the greatest sympathy is felt for her in her sorrow. This is accentuated by the fact that another son, Private Robert Falls, of the Inniskillings, was killed at Mons al little over a year ago.
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21/12/2018 Pte. Samuel Falls From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915: Private Samuel Falls
21/12/2018 Pte. Wesley C McClelland Troopers Wesley McClelland, Cookstown and Samuel Espey, Tullyboy, both of the North Irish Horse, have been home for a few days furlough, and are looking fit and well. The y have been for a considerable time, on the bodyguard of the Commander in Chief, and consequently some distance from the firing line. They seem to feel that there would be more life in being engaged in the active hostilities.
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21/12/2018 Pte. Wesley C McClelland From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915: North Irish Horse Troopers Home
21/12/2018 Reg QMS James Alex Bell Barlowe Staff Sergeant Jim A B Barlowe, Royal Irish Rifles, has been appointed (acting) Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant (Warrant Officer Class Two). He is the only son of Mr J A Barlowe, formerly of Stewartstown, where he was born twenty years ago. He was educated at Belfast Royal Academical Institution, where he excelled in French, Latin and Mathematics. He had just begun his career as a journalist when war broke out. Not choosing to wait for a commission, he enlisted as a private soldier in the Young Citizen’s Volunteers. After five months service, he was transferred to the 17th Battalion as a lance corporal, attained to the highest public rank of his department in less than eight months, and is the youngest of his rank in the British Army. He is a well-known cricketer, played for the regimental team last summer and is the holder of several athletics trophies. His father served in the depot, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, the North of Ireland Imperial Yeomanry and the North Irish Horse; his grandfather the late Mr James Barlowe, served for some time in his youth in the 27th Inniskillings; his great-grandfather, Sergeant Major James Barlowe, Fintona Corps of Yeomanry, was a veteran of the Irish Rebellion of 1798, and in 1797 was one of the two yeomen who made the memorable defence of Dungiven Glebe, and its valuable stores of arms and ammunition against over 300 rebels. Both the father, grandfather and great-grandfather of this Sergeant Barlowe (who died in 1831) served in the army, the last named having been a commissioned officer.
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21/12/2018 Reg QMS James Alex Bell Barlowe From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th December 1915:
20/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. Prior to going to the war, Private Irwin was with his battalion in India.
20/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Private R Irwin, who is a son of Mrs A Irwin, Hillhead, Castledawson, also came from India to Gallipoli. He was twice wounded, once in the head by shrapnel and next by a rifle bullet which he still carried embedded in his body. On one occasion he risked his life to succour a German officer who had laid between the trenches for three days. After binding up his wounds, he managed to bring him safely into the British trench as a prisoner. He is at present at the regimental headquarters in Derry City.
20/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Lance Corporal M J McAnary is a brother of Mrs Joseph Johnston, Leitrim, Castledawson, and had eight years’ service when he came with his battalion from India. Previous to the deed recorded above, he was wounded in the shoulder by shrapnel; and subsequently while leading his company of bomb throwers, he was shot in the knee, from the effects of which wound he is still suffering. A few minutes before being hit, a bullet passed through his helmet, grazing the hair. He is at present on leave at Castledawson.
20/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. ‘On the night of 6th June, a company of Royal Engineers were engaged in putting up wire entanglements in front of the trench occupied by the Inniskillings. Dawn came before the work was completed and the Engineers out there on the coverless knoll at once became targets for the Turks, scarcely thirty yards away. The first man to fall was the officer in charge, and heedless of the murderous fire, Private Irwin leapt from the trench as he fell and ran to his assistance. The only other Castledawson man in the battalion was Lance Corporal McAnary, and it is a remarkable fact that although separated by a number of sections, and without either knowing the other’s intention, these two should so gallantly risk their lives at the same instant. It was only when they reached the fallen officer that they recognised each other. The officer had been shot through the leg, and just as McAnary and Irwin lifted him, a second bullet severely wounded him on the other leg. The official account of the incident says:- ‘In face of deadly rifle fire, these two men ran from the trench and brought in a wounded Royal Engineers officer. Their actions saved the officer’s life.’
20/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. Among the names mentioned by Sir Ian Hamilton in his recently published despatch, were those of two Castledawson men, Private (now Lance Corporal) Matthew J McAnary and Private Robert Irwin, both of the 1st Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers.
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20/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 27th November 1915: Castledawson Soldiers Mentioned in Despatches
20/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. Private R Irwin, who is a son of Mrs A Irwin, Hillhead, Castledawson, also came from India to Gallipoli. He was twice wounded, once in the head by shrapnel and next by a rifle bullet which he still carried embedded in his body. On one occasion he risked his life to succour a German officer who had laid between the trenches for three days. After binding up his wounds, he managed to bring him safely into the British trench as a prisoner. He is at present at the regimental headquarters in Derry City.
20/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. Lance Corporal M J McAnary is a brother of Mrs Joseph Johnston, Leitrim, Castledawson, and had eight years’ service when he came with his battalion from India. Previous to the deed recorded above, he was wounded in the shoulder by shrapnel; and subsequently while leading his company of bomb throwers, he was shot in the knee, from the effects of which wound he is still suffering. A few minutes before being hit, a bullet passed through his helmet, grazing the hair. He is at present on leave at Castledawson.
20/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. ‘On the night of 6th June, a company of Royal Engineers were engaged in putting up wire entanglements in front of the trench occupied by the Inniskillings. Dawn came before the work was completed and the Engineers out there on the coverless knoll at once became targets for the Turks, scarcely thirty yards away. The first man to fall was the officer in charge, and heedless of the murderous fire, Private Irwin leapt from the trench as he fell and ran to his assistance. The only other Castledawson man in the battalion was Lance Corporal McAnary, and it is a remarkable fact that although separated by a number of sections, and without either knowing the other’s intention, these two should so gallantly risk their lives at the same instant. It was only when they reached the fallen officer that they recognised each other. The officer had been shot through the leg, and just as McAnary and Irwin lifted him, a second bullet severely wounded him on the other leg. The official account of the incident says:- ‘In face of deadly rifle fire, these two men ran from the trench and brought in a wounded Royal Engineers officer. Their actions saved the officer’s life.’
20/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. Among the names mentioned by Sir Ian Hamilton in his recently published despatch, were those of two Castledawson men, Private (now Lance Corporal) Matthew J McAnary and Private Robert Irwin, both of the 1st Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers.
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20/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 27th November 1915: Castledawson Soldiers Mentioned in Despatches
20/12/2018 Pte. Francis Donaghy Sergeant Hayes on Wednesday arrested in Cookstown two local members of the 3rd Inniskillings named William Rooney and Frank Donaghy; while Constable Donegan arrested John Bradley of the same battalion. The trio were charged before Mr Henry Alfred Mann. J.P., on Thursday with being absentees from their battalion in Derry. They were remanded pending the arrival of an escort, which came for them on Thursday. The escort was in charge of Sergeant Major Rundle, formerly recruiting officer in Cookstown, whom many friends were pleased to see looking in the pink of condition. A remarkable fact regarding the three accused soldiers is that they broke bounds in Derry on Saturday night and walked all the way to Cookstown via Dungiven and over the mountains. This performance does credit to their marching ability whatever may be said amongst them otherwise.
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20/12/2018 Pte. Francis Donaghy From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 27th November 1915: Soldiers Arrested in Cookstown
20/12/2018 L/Sgt Edward Joseph Timoney McATAMNEY – TIMONEY – 16th November, with nuptial mass at St Mary’s R.C. Church, Lavey, by Rev Michael O’Neill, P.P., assisted by Rev Paul McKenna, C.C., Edward John, second son of John McAtamney, Moyogall, to Mary Teresa, only daughter of Edward Timoney, Cookstown.
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20/12/2018 L/Sgt Edward Joseph Timoney From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 20th November 1915: MARRIAGES (sister of Edward Timoney)
20/12/2018 Pte. John Timoney McATAMNEY – TIMONEY – 16th November, with nuptial mass at St Mary’s R.C. Church, Lavey, by Rev Michael O’Neill, P.P., assisted by Rev Paul McKenna, C.C., Edward John, second son of John McAtamney, Moyogall, to Mary Teresa, only daughter of Edward Timoney, Cookstown.
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20/12/2018 Pte. John Timoney From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 20th November 1915: MARRIAGES (sister of John Timoney)
20/12/2018 Pte. Alexander McIlree Private D McIlree, who is in France in the Ulster Division, writing to his sister at Drapersfield on 9th November, says he is well and is proud to once again have on the uniform, and to have so many brothers serving their country. Referring to his brother Alex, killed in action, he says it was in a good cause and he is himself prepared for a like fate on behalf of the cause should it be demanded of him. He says it is no picnic at the front at present, but all are cheerful. The writer is one of the six sons of Widow McIlree, all of whom are soldiers, the youngest having fallen.
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20/12/2018 Pte. Alexander McIlree From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 20th November 1915: Private D McIlree in France (brother of Alexander McIlree)
17/12/2018 C.S.M. William Murdock When the war broke out, the deceased’s youngest brother George, who was employed in Scotland, immediately volunteered and is at present at the front with the Royal Scots.
17/12/2018 C.S.M. William Murdock ‘I regret very deeply indeed to have to convey to you the sad news of the death of your husband. He fell in action on 25th September. Captain Rush, commanding B Company, regarded your husband’s death as a great loss to the battalion and especially to B Company. With much sympathy in your sorrow.’
17/12/2018 C.S.M. William Murdock Second Lieutenant John Small of the 9th Black Watch, in writing to Mrs Murdock says:-
17/12/2018 C.S.M. William Murdock ‘In all probability you have already received an official intimation that your husband, CSM W Murdock, 9th Black Watch, was killed in action on 25th September. I wish to express to you the deep sympathy of the entire regiment in your great grief at the loss of so good and brave a man. We all miss him very much and so can understand in a small way what your sorrow must be. He died a hero’s death and lies buried on the battlefield just where he fell. He gave his life for a good noble cause and is now I am sure enjoying the reward of his great sacrifice. May God bless you and give you strength and courage to bear your grief.’
17/12/2018 C.S.M. William Murdock Rev H J Collins, chaplain with the company, writing on 22nd October to the deceased wife says:-
17/12/2018 C.S.M. William Murdock Information has been received that Company Sergeant Major William James Murdock, Black Watch, eldest son of Mr Richard Murdock, Unagh, Cookstown, was killed in action on 25th September. He had just completed his 21 years’ service a few weeks before war was declared. Shortly after enlisting he was sent to South Africa at the time of the Jameson raid, and when trouble was ended there, he was sent to India where he remained until the South African war broke out. He was again sent to South Africa and took part in a number of engagements and escaped without receiving a scratch. He served six more years in India and the last two years of his term were spent at Perth. In July 1914 he retired on pension and went to live in Edinburgh. When war was declared, he was called up and for several months he was engaged in drilling troops in England and went out to the front with his regiment during the summer. He was about 43 years of age and leaves a wife and five children.
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17/12/2018 C.S.M. William Murdock From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th November 1915: Sergeant Major W J Murdock
17/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Sloan Inserted by his sorrowing sister and brother-in-law, Mrs Annie and Thomas Chambers, Tullycall, Cookstown.
17/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Sloan A loving mother waits in heaven, to take him by the hand.
17/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Sloan Bereaved of a home here on earth, he died in a distant land,
17/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Sloan Brave to the last, to his God he passed, and the victor’s crown has won.
17/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Sloan At rest all battles over, the weary marching done,
17/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Sloan SLOAN – In fond and loving memory of my dear brother, Private Thomas Sloan, No 5867, Royal Scots Fusiliers, who died of wounds received in France on 2nd November 1914.
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17/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Sloan From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th November 1915:
17/12/2018 Corp Thomas Espey Thomas Espey, a native of Auglish, Cookstown, who emigrated to South Africa about fifteen years ago, where he joined the Cape Police, and who a few months ago joined the South African Highlanders to fight on behalf of the Old Country, has been home on a few days furlough. He was one of 3,000 men especially selected by General Botha personally, to come over as an advance contingent, and they arrived in England about two months ago. Every man of that kilted corps is over six feet in height, and there are thousands more to follow later. They are for the fighting line at an early date. Before emigrating, this now Colonial Highlander was a booking clerk at the Northern Counties Railway Station, Cookstown.
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17/12/2018 Corp Thomas Espey From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th November 1915: Thomas Espey, South African Highlander
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart The search still continues for Lord Stuart’s brother, Captain the Hon R S Stuart, 1st Royal Scots Fusiliers, now Viscount Stuart, who was reported wounded and is missing since November, but hopes are cherished that he may be a prisoner of war, though his name has not been returned. Should it be too that he has lost his life, the Hon Arthur Stuart, Lieutenant, 7th Royal Berks Regiment, bridge machine gun officer, 78th Infantry Brigade, becomes Viscount Stuart.
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart His parents and his younger brothers and sisters mourn the loss of one they loved and who seemed so eminently fitted to adorn the position which would have been his, in the natural course of time, but for the bullet of the enemy. We too, representing the district associated with the Castlestewart family, lament the death of Viscount Stuart – a serious student of human problems, brought up in the atmosphere of a Christian home combining the refined taste of the art connoisseur with the patronage of healthy games – he should have become an ideal leader to the community in which he lived, as well as an ornament of the nobility of which he would have been a member.
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart Lord Stewart was the author of the following verses entitled ‘Sailor, what of the debt we owe you?’ which appeared in the Times on 16th September 1914:- (see above)
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart ‘As you might have expected, he died a very gallant death, like the brave officer he was. Having led his men in attacking the enemy, we were in turn counter-attacked, and the Viscount was shot through the lungs. He did not speak beyond saying ‘Oh sergeant’, and died by my side. May I respectfully offer you my deepest sympathy on your sad loss, a loss that is shared by every man in the regiment.’
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart Lord Stuart’s sergeant, who is now in England suffering from gas poisoning, also writes:-
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart ‘Lord Stuart was holding a very advanced trench near Halanes (Hohenzollern Redoubt) when he was shot through the heart, so that death was instantaneous. The trench had to be evacuated, and so his body could not be recovered. The officer who told me this was afterwards killed. Lord Stuart was a favourite with all ranks and was ever thoughtful for the comfort of his men, who consequently would follow him anywhere. In short, he was a very gallant gentleman.’
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart Viscount Stuart was educated at Shrewsbury and Corpus Christi College, Oxford, with a view to entering the Indian Civil Service. Failing to pass, he turned to literary and scholastic work, interesting himself in the questions of the day, notably education and agriculture. His chief pastime was rowing, for which he carried off cups at school, and he rowed in the college boat at Oxford. He combined a taste for literature for fine arts with love for an open air life and did everything he could to encourage games, both when at home and at the front. He also travelled a good deal, not only on the continent, visiting the picture galleries, and in Egypt, but enjoyed a visit to the Holy Land. He was private secretary to Mr Turner, of Stoke Rockford, when the war broke out. With all the best of our nobility, he answered the country’s call and volunteered for active service. He obtained a commission in the Royal Scots and last May proceeded to the front. He took part in the great advance of the allies in France which commenced on 25th September and died defending the captured trenches. His colonel has supplied the following particulars of his last stand:-
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart The deceased, who was 34 years of age and unmarried, was the eldest son and heir of the 6th Earl of Castlestewart (late of Madras Civil Service who succeeded to the title last year) and Emma Georgina, Countess of Castlestewart, the youngest daughter of the late General Arthur Stephens, and Indian Mutiny veteran.
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart We much regret to record the death of Andrew john, Viscount Stuart, Lieutenant of the 6th Royal Scots Fusiliers, who was killed in action in France between 25th and 27th September.
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16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 16th October 1915: Viscount Stuart
16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart STUART – Killed in action in France between 25th and 27th September, Andrew, Viscount Stuart, Lieutenant, 6th Service Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers, eldest and dearly loved son of the Earl and Countess of Castlestewart, aged 34.
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16/12/2018 Lieut Andrew John Viscount Stuart From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 16th October 1915:
16/12/2018 Pte. Wesley C McClelland Trooper James B Marks, of the North Irish Horse. Has just paid a visit to his parents who reside at Drumads, Coagh. Jim, who was well-known in Coagh and district, was called up for active service at the beginning of hostilities, and is only once home on leave since then. He was looking fit and well, and although taking part in many engagements, including the retreat from Mons, he has so far escaped uninjured. He has been serving with the bodyguard to Sir John French, and amongst some of the local soldiers with whom he was acquainted in France he mentioned troopers Wesley McClelland, Cookstown and Hiram Irwin, Drapersfield. During his short stay at home, he has had numerous visitors, to all of which he spoke well of his treatment both in France and Belgium, but of any other experiences at the front he didn’t care to say anything, except that he had been fortunate in escaping so far. Trooper Marks has now returned to his unit in France again, leaving Coagh on Wednesday.
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16/12/2018 Pte. Wesley C McClelland From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 16th October 1915:
15/12/2018 L/Sgt William Boyd The last hope of this splendid Ulsterman was granted. Mortally wounded by a shell storming the enemy position in a wood during the great advance, he was removed to Dieppe Hospital, where he lived long enough to hear the news of the great victory, and then he passed away quietly. The R.I.C. and the Army are poorer for his loss.
15/12/2018 L/Sgt William Boyd ‘Just a line in haste to say I am well and have stuck some very stiff marches in order to get here. We are getting nearer the danger zone every minute, in fact we are right up to it now, and shall have the honour of taking part in one of the greatest battles in the world’s history. I must face it bravely and do my part well, as the fate of the Empire and future generations depend on what is about to be done and how we do it. If you do not get a personal correspondence from me in a few days you may guess what has happened; but death’s sting will lose its sharpness if I am spared long enough to see old England’s troops carrying the positions and proving victorious once more.’
15/12/2018 L/Sgt William Boyd A melancholy interest relates to a letter just received from Sergeant William Boyd, 2nd Battalion Irish Guards, whose death is reported. Boyd, who was a native of Pomeroy, was a police constable in Craven Street Barracks, Belfast, when he volunteered for the Guards. His last letter to a comrade in that station, on the eve of the recent great battle, contains the following passage:
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15/12/2018 L/Sgt William Boyd From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 15th October 1915: Sergeant Boyd’s Last Wish
15/12/2018 Pte. Robert Davison The newspaper report below mentions Megargy and that townland borders on Brackaghslievegallion.
15/12/2018 Pte. Robert Davison At the last monthly meeting of Megargy L.O.L. No 268, Pride of Ulster, it was unanimously decided to forward Br. Robert Davison, who is at present with the Ulster Division at the front, a wristlet watch as a small memento of their brotherly affection, together with an expression of their wish that he may be spared to return to his native lodge at the termination of the war.
15/12/2018 Pte. Robert Davison 01692
15/12/2018 Pte. Robert Davison From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 9th October 1915: Magherafelt
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne The remains of the late Private Joseph Bayne, 3rd Battalion Royal Inniskillings, whose wife resided at Coagh Street, Cookstown, were interred on Tuesday in Derryloran Old Churchyard, amid many evidences of grief, and of respect for the gallant soldier, of whom it can be truly written – ‘He died for his country, what more could he do?’ Private Bayne died on Friday 1st October in a Military Hospital in Coventry as a result of wounds received at the Dardanelles on 5th April. The military authorities inquired if the relatives would wish the remains sent home, and on receiving a reply in the affirmative, the corpse was coffined and despatched to Cookstown and arrived on Tuesday, where the remains were met by a large assemblage of all creeds and classes, and of both sexes. Much sympathy was felt for the grief stricken young wife, and her only child, a little boy born since he went on active service. No less affecting was the grief of his aged mother, as she wept over the coffin of her son – and not so many years ago her baby. The deceased was a member of the William Orr branch of the Irish National Forresters, Cookstown, and the members showed their respect for their late brother by assembling and marching in processional order in front of the funeral cortege, headed by Messrs Lewis Devlin (chief ranger), John Hagan (S.C.R.), Dr Gillespie (branch surgeon) and Patrick McClarnon (secretary). They also sent a beautiful wreath. Wreaths were also sent by the female branch of the local Forresters, and ‘from mother, brother and sisters’, and from ‘the nursing staff of the Military Hospital, Coventry’. The remains were taken into the Church of the Most Holy Trinity, where the prayers for the dead were recited by Rev Father McLaughlin, C.C., who also officiated at the grave side. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs John Mulgrew & son, Cookstown.
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne 01691
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 9th October 1915: Cookstown Soldier’s Funeral - Private Joseph Bayne
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne Inserted by his sorrowing wife, and by his sister-in-law and brother-in law, Ellen and Willie.
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne A faithful husband true and kind, none on this world like him I find.’
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne Rest dear husband, thy pain is over, thy loving hand will toil no more.
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne Weep not for me nor sorrow take, but love my young son for my sake.
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne ‘Farewell dear wife I had to go, and leave you in this world of woe.
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne BAYNE – In loving memory of Joseph Bayne, who died 1st October 1915
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15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 9th October 1915:
15/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne Private Joseph Bayne was with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in Gallipoli where he was seriously wounded in the back on 5th April 1915.
15/12/2018 Pte. John Timoney Lance Sergeant Edward Joseph Timoney was an elder brother of John. Edward survived the war but died whilst still in service in India on 17th September 1920.
15/12/2018 Pte. John Timoney Private John Timoney was swerving with the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers when he was killed in action on 11th July 1916 near Ovillers-la-Boiselle.
14/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne BAYNE - 30th September at the Military hospital, Coventry, from wounds received at the Dardanelles, Private Joseph Bayne, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, of Coagh Street, Cookstown.
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14/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd October 1915:
14/12/2018 Pte. Joseph Bayne Private Bayne’s condition gradually deteriorated and he died from his wounds at the Military Hospital, Coventry, on Friday 1st October 1915. He was 30 years old.
13/12/2018 Pte. Henry (Harry) Tohill Private Marcus Hagan, 7th Munsters, writing to his mother in Magherafelt, states that Private Joseph Walls and Harry Tohill are both wounded and the latter missing.
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13/12/2018 Pte. Henry (Harry) Tohill From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915:
13/12/2018 Pte. Martin McFlinn ‘I feel it is my duty to write and explain the circumstances under which your son met his death, as I am his commanding officer. He was working with me in a very exposed spot, both to shrapnel and rifle fire, and was carrying on his work in a most able manner; so much so that I had occasion to compliment him very highly. He not only attended to many wounded with absolute coolness, relieving many suffering, but saved a man’s life earlier in the day by holding his finger over the man's bleeding artery for half an hour under heavy fire until help came - a most excellent piece of work. It was at night, when most of the firing had ceased, that a stray bullet hit him in the head, and he died a few hours later. Don't grieve after the boy, as he carried out his duties excellently, and met his end as a soldier should.’
13/12/2018 Pte. Martin McFlinn The Catholic Press of Sydney contains the portrait of Private Martin McFlynn, of Annandale, Sydney, who has died of wounds received in action. He is a son of Mr Michael McFlynn, a large contractor of Sydney, who left Cookstown about thirty years ago. He came from the Keenaghan district, but we believe that none of his relatives are now in Ireland. He came to Cookstown and served his time to the carpentry with the late Mr John Kane of Gortalowry, and was very energetic and reliable, giving promise of a successful career. Believing he would have greater opportunities in the New World, he emigrated and married an Australian lady. His son Martin volunteered with the Australian Expedition and was attached to the Army Medical Corps. He received wounds which proved fatal. His father received the following consoling letter from the Captain:-
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13/12/2018 Pte. Martin McFlinn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915: Private McFlynn, Sydney
13/12/2018 Pte. Samuel James MacFarlane 01686
13/12/2018 Pte. Samuel James MacFarlane From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915: Private Samuel MacFarlane
13/12/2018 L/Corp Robert Lawless The war trophies on view in our office this week include the white metal badge from the helmet of a Bavarian officer who ventured too near the British lines and was shot by Corporal Lawless of the 2nd Inniskillings, who was on picket duty. He secured the badge and sent it home to his father, Mr John Lawless, of Church Street, Cookstown, who has lent it in order that the townspeople may see it and perhaps some of them will be inspired to do likewise. Another new exhibit this week consists of two fifteen pounder Boer shells which were used in 1899 during the Boer campaign. They were brought here by Sergeant Henry Devlin, Coagh Street, of the Royal Field Artillery, who has been out in France and is at present home on holidays and had very narrow escapes. He has also left on view a clip of five live cartridges as used in the Lee-Metford service rifle.
13/12/2018 L/Corp Robert Lawless 01685
13/12/2018 L/Corp Robert Lawless From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915:
13/12/2018 Maj Algernon Hubert Cuthell ‘Irish Life’ for this week contains the fifth album of Irish heroes, who have lost their lives in the war. Amongst these are portraits of Private Morrow V.C. and Major Cuthell.
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13/12/2018 Maj Algernon Hubert Cuthell From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915:
13/12/2018 R/man Francis Carron Mrs John Carron, Stewartstown, has received intimation that her brother-in-law, Private Francis Carron, of the 6th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action in the Dardanelles on the 18th August. He belonged to a family long resident in Stewartstown, and enlisted on the outbreak of the war. His brother is serving in the 8th Inniskillings.
13/12/2018 R/man Francis Carron 01682
13/12/2018 R/man Francis Carron From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915: Private Carron, Stewartstown
13/12/2018 R/man Francis Carron CARRON – Killed in action at the Dardanelles on 18th August. Private Francis Carron, Stewartstown.
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13/12/2018 R/man Francis Carron From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915:
10/12/2018 Pte. Wesley C McClelland We have on exhibition in our shop windows some war relics kindly sent to us by Lance Corporal Herbert McClelland, son of Mr Sloan McClelland, Cookstown, who is home on a few days leave, looking very fit. The most interesting is a jagged fragment of a German shell which burst on Monday night, 13th September, within 400 feet of where the Canadian regiment, of which Lance Corporal McClelland is a unit, were at supper somewhere in Belgium. The others are a long series of buttons of various Belgian regiments fastened on to a leather strap, and a Belgian bayonet picked on a battlefield of Dixmude.
10/12/2018 Pte. Wesley C McClelland 01681
10/12/2018 Pte. Wesley C McClelland From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 18th September 1915: War Relics- Herbert McClelland (brother of Wesley McClelland)
10/12/2018 Pte. Samuel James MacFarlane ‘The council of the urban district of Portrush beg to convey to councillor MacFarlane and Mrs MacFarlane their deepest sympathy with them and the members of their family in the bereavement which they have sustained by the death of their son Samuel, who died of wounds received in action at the Dardanelles while nobly fighting for his King and country in time of danger. Their prayer is that God may sustain them in their trouble.’
10/12/2018 Pte. Samuel James MacFarlane MACFARLANE – died of wounds received at Dardanelles. Samuel J, youngest son of James and Sarah MacFarlane, of Skerry Bhan, Portrush, age 21 years.
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10/12/2018 Pte. Samuel James MacFarlane From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 18th September 1915:
10/12/2018 Pte. John Donaldson Private John Donaldson, 3rd Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was on sick leave, failed to report himself on 12th August, and on Monday surrendered himself to the constabulary at Stewartstown, and was placed under arrest. The police wired the military authorities and an escort arrived and conveyed him to Derry. Donaldson was on active service in France, and about six months ago he got a wound on the hand and was sent back to Ireland.
10/12/2018 Pte. John Donaldson 01679
10/12/2018 Pte. John Donaldson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 18th September 1915: Arrest of Deserter at Stewartstown
10/12/2018 Pte. Samuel James MacFarlane We regret to announce the death, from wounds received at the Dardanelles, of the youngest son of Mr and Mrs James MacFarlane was born on 17th March 1894, at Doons, Cookstown. He was educated at the Royal Academical Institute, Belfast, and Coleraine Academical Institute. On leaving school he served his apprenticeship as midshipman with the Henderson line of steamers trading between Glasgow and Rangoon. Afterwards he went out to the Coast trade in Australia. On his arrival at Sydney he found that war had been declared and immediately volunteered for active service in the Naval and Military Expedition. He was through the New Guinea campaign, and on the troops being disbanded on their return to Sydney, he was offered a commission if he would remain there for three months to assist in the training of other volunteers. He however preferred to volunteer at once for active service in Europe, and was sent first to Cairo and then to the Dardanelles, where he was fatally wounded, and died on 20th August. He was a lifelong abstainer and an ardent Unionist, and on his visit home two years ago, he devoted himself to training the signalling corps for the U.V.F. at Portrush. At a special meeting of Portrush Urban District Council, of which Mr MacFarlane is vice-chairman, the following resolution, proposed by Mr Morrow, and seconded by Mr A C Scott, J.P., was passed in silence:-
09/12/2018 Pte. Henry (Harry) Tohill Mr Henry Tohill, Rainey Street, has received intimation that his son, Private Hugh Tohill, 7th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, Irish Brigade, has been wounded at the Dardanelles and is at present lying in hospital in Alexandria. His brother Frank has been twice wounded in the same place.
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09/12/2018 Pte. Henry (Harry) Tohill From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915: (some discrepancies in this report - brother of Henry?)
09/12/2018 2nd Lieut Albert Victor Morrison 01677
09/12/2018 2nd Lieut Cecil Alexander Crowe 01677
09/12/2018 Pte. John Patrick Tohill 01677
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean 01677
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean James McClean’s grave was sadly lost and he is now commemorated on the Screen Wall at Belfast City Cemetery.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean Private James McClean’s funeral took place on Wednesday 8th September with full military honours. The funeral was accompanied by a band. The service was conducted by the Rev. M. Archdale, Chaplain to the Forces. A firing party fired three volleys and a bugler sounded the ‘Last Post’.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean James’ cousin was Sergeant James Somers who received a Victoria Cross at Gallipoli in August 1915.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean James had two brothers already serving in the army at the time of his death. One was a prisoner of war in Germany.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean Private James McClean was serving with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers when he died of illness in Belfast on Monday 6th September 1915.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean Shortly after returning to Randalstown Camp he took ill again, and from June 1915 until he passed away he was under constant care and treatment at the Military Hospital, Donegal Road, Belfast and later at Purdysburn Hospital, also in Belfast.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean Upon his discharge from Antrim Hospital he returned to Cookstown and spent a few days with his old employer Mr Richardson, who thought highly of the young boy.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean In the spring of 1915, At Shane’s Park Camp at Randalstown, he contracted Scarlet Fever. He made a good recovery.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean Private James McClean was initially stationed at Finner Camp, County Donegal
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean He persisted however with every visit to recruiting stations until recruiting sergeants and examining doctors finally accepted him as fit for service and he was posted to the 9th Inniskilling Fusiliers in October 1914.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean Shortly after the outbreak of war he volunteered for the army, but was rejected on account of his defective eyesight.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean James McClean joined the Cookstown section of the Ulster Volunteers shortly after its formation, and despite his youth and poor eyesight he proved to be very capable and greatly admired by both the officers and men for his pluck and adaptability.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean The 1911 census lists James as age 15 year old apprentice, living with the Richardsons at house 12 in Molesworth Street, Cookstown.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean As an orphan, James came to live with in Cookstown with Mr A W Richardson, where he served his apprenticeship in the drapery business.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean James’ father died in 1907. James McClean senior was a builder and contactor. James would have been eleven years old.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean James’ mother, Isabella McLean, died in 1902 when James was six years old.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean The 1901 census lists James Andrew as age 5, living with the family at house 3 in Kilconny, Belturbet, County Cavan. His father was a builder.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean Family: James McLean, Isabella McLean, John McLean (born about 1895), James Andrew McLean (born about 1896), Albert William McLean (born about 1898), Kathleen McLean (born about 1899).
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean James McClean was born in Belturbet, County Cavan about 1896. He was the second of four children.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean James McClean was the second son of James and Isabella McClean.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean The popularity which young McClean’s bright disposition won for him in civil life was sustained in the army, where he was well liked by his officers and comrades. He came off a fighting stock, his two brothers, as stated, being in the army, an uncle is an army captain, and Sergeant Somers, V.C., who is a native of Belturbet, is a cousin. During his illness, Mr Richardson (with whom and Mrs Richardson, the deceased had a comfortable home) and other friends visited him, and in the early stages of his illness he was very much interested in the happenings in and around Cookstown. The funeral took place to Belfast City Cemetery on Wednesday afternoon. An escort of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, in charge of an officer, being in attendance, accompanied by a band. The funeral service was conducted by Rev M Archdale, Chaplain to the Forces, and at the conclusion the firing party fired three volleys, and the buglers sounded the Last Post. The chief mourners were two uncles of the deceased – Messrs William J Donaldson and Thomas A Donaldson, Belturbet. Much sympathy is felt with the deceased’s sister, who resides at Belturbet.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean Members of Cookstown Company of the U.V.F. and others who knew him, will learn with regret of the death of Jim McClean, which occurred on Monday morning at Purdysburn Hospital, Belfast. The deceased, who was only nineteen years of age, served his apprenticeship to the drapery business with Mr A W Richardson, Cookstown, and was very popular with his employer, and was a general favourite. He was a native of Belturbet, County Cavan, and an orphan. His father, the late James McClean, builder and contractor, Belturbet, died eight years ago and his mother had died five years previously. The family consisted of three boys and a girl, and all three boys joined the army, one of them being at present a prisoner of war in Germany and the other is on active service in France. Jim joined the U.V.F. shortly after its organisation, and despite his youth and a defect in his eyesight, he proved a very capable member, and was admired by both officers and men for his pluck and adaptability. Shortly after the outbreak of war he volunteered for the army, but was rejected on account of his defective vision. He however persisted in his visits to recruiting sergeants and examining doctors, until he was finally accepted in October, when he joined the 9th Inniskillings. He was stationed with his battalion in Finner, and subsequently at Randalstown. At the latter place he contracted scarlatina in the spring, but made a good recovery, and after his discharge from hospital at Antrim, he spent a few days leave in Cookstown with Mr Richardson, his former employer. Shortly after returning to Randalstown he again took ill, and from June until he passed away, he was under treatment in the Military Hospital, Donegal Road, Belfast, and latterly in Purdysburn.
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean 01676
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915: Private Jim McClean
09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean McCLEAN - 6th September, at Purdysburn Hospital, Belfast. Private James McClean (17814), 9th (Service) Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, formerly of Mr A W Richardson’s, Cookstown, second son of the late James McClean, builder and contractor, Belturbet. Interred in Belfast City Cemetery on Wednesday.
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09/12/2018 Pte. James McClean From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915:
09/12/2018 Pte. James King At a meeting of Greenvale Swifts F.C., held on Monday, a resolution was passed expressing deepest sympathy with the relatives of Private James King, who died from wounds received at the Dardanelles on 14th August 1915. He enlisted on the outbreak of the war on the Inniskillings. He was stationed at Derry, and went to the Dardanelles, and on 4th September, his death was officially notified to his father. The late James King was a worthy member of the above club, he was well liked by all his fellow members. His position was left half. He was a thorough sportsman all through, and took a real interest in the game. He was also a staunch member of the Irish Volunteers. This is the fourth member of the above club who fell fighting for his country and King. Signed James Fields (captain) and John Cooney (secretary).
09/12/2018 Pte. James King 01674
09/12/2018 Pte. James King From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915:
09/12/2018 Pte. James King Mr John King and Mrs King, Blackhill, Cookstown, have received an official intimation from the War Office that their son, Private James King, of the Inniskillings, has died from wounds received in action at the Dardanelles on 14th August. Private King, who was not quite 21 years of age, joined the army at the beginning of the war. Previous to enlistment he was employed with Messrs Thomas Adair and Sons, and was very popular. The deceased’s two brothers are also in the army, Joseph being in France and John in Cork, where he is expecting to be ordered out at any time. The father was also in the army and passed through the Boer War on the Army Service Corps. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, and also the three sisters of the deceased in their sad bereavement. The sympathy of the King and Queen has been expressed to them in a note from Lord Kitchener.
09/12/2018 Pte. James King 01673
09/12/2018 Pte. James King From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915: Private James King
08/12/2018 Maj Algernon Hubert Cuthell CUTHELL – Killed in action at the Dardanelles on 22nd August, Major Algernon Hubert Cuthell, 9th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment, only son of Lieutenant Colonel and Mrs Cuthell, Goldhill Lodge, Farnham, and husband of Rhona Cuthell (nee Adair), aged 36 years.
08/12/2018 Maj Algernon Hubert Cuthell 01672
08/12/2018 Maj Algernon Hubert Cuthell From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915:
08/12/2018 Pte. James P Cassidy Private Cassidy, who was previously wounded in the face, is an old soldier, having passed through the South African war unhurt. His time had expired, but he volunteered for service when the present war broke out.
08/12/2018 Pte. James P Cassidy ‘I expect to be discharged. It is not bad being wounded twice since I left Derry, only in May. I think I have done my share and some of the rest of them can come out and try themselves, and then they would see actual warfare.’
08/12/2018 Pte. James P Cassidy Mrs Cassidy, Church Street, Cookstown, has been informed by the War Office that her husband, Private James Cassidy, of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, has been wounded in action at the Dardanelles in an engagement on 11th August. She has also received two letters from her husband – one from the base hospital and the other from Redlands War Hospital, Reading, to which he has been removed. From these it appears the wound is in the left arm. He says he believes he was struck by an explosive bullet, as the bone in the arm is broken in two or more places. The doctors have told him that his arm is likely to be permanently disabled. He adds:-
08/12/2018 Pte. James P Cassidy 01671
08/12/2018 Pte. James P Cassidy From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915: Private James Cassidy Again Wounded
07/12/2018 R/man Francis Carron Mrs John Carron, Stewartstown, has received a letter from the War Office conveying the sad tidings that her brother in law, Private Francis Carron, of the 6th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action in the Dardanelles on the 8th August. And enclosed was an expression of regret from the King and Queen. The deceased belonged to a family long resident in Stewartstown, and joined the army at the outbreak of the war. He has a brother at present serving with the 8th Inniskillings.
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07/12/2018 R/man Francis Carron From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th September 1915: Private Carron
05/12/2018 Corp John Ramsay Word has just arrived that Corporal John Ramsay, 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, has been wounded at the Dardanelles. The casualty took place at the late landing in Suvla Bay. He is at present in hospital in Aberdeen. Corporal Ramsay, of 22 Wilmot Terrace, Lisburn Road, Belfast (an only son of a widowed mother, and nephew of Mr George Ramsay, Mountain View, Cookstown), enlisted at the outbreak of the war in the 6th Inniskillings. He was in the employment of Messrs John Thompson and Sons, Belfast, and he receives half pay from that firm while he is in the army. He and the men of C Company speak very highly of their officer, Captain Crothers, who is greatly appreciated and loved by the men.
05/12/2018 Corp John Ramsay 01669
05/12/2018 Corp John Ramsay From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 28th August 1915: Corporal John Ramsay
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon Inserted by his sorrowing wife and children, Louisville, Cookstown.
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon And our defence is sure.’
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon Sufficient in Thine arm alone,
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon Thy saints have dwelt secure,
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon Beneath the shadow of Thy throne,
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon And our eternal Home.
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon Our shelter from the stormy blast,
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon Our hope for years to come,
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon ‘O God our help in ages past
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon NIXON – In loving and affectionate remembrance of my dear husband, Private William Nixon, who was killed in action on 26th August 1914.
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon 01668
05/12/2018 Pte. William Nixon From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 28th August 1915:
05/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Devlin Private John Doyle, 1st Inniskillings, whose mother resides at Loy Street, Cookstown, has also arrived home on a week’s leave. After training in Dublin he went out to the Dardanelles in a draft from Londonderry, and was in the fighting line for two months. A piece of shrapnel from a shell which burst near him wounded him severely on the cheek in a downward flight, and lodged in his left shoulder. The sight of his right eye is seriously affected and the doctors have advised an operation. He was unconscious for seven days, and woke to consciousness in the No 2 Camp Eye Hospital, Glymnopolulo, Alexandria. With the exception of the weakness of the eye, Private Doyle is now almost recovered. He saw in hospital Alex. Knipe, Joseph Bain and Thomas Devlin, all wounded, but doing well, and in good spirits when he left.
05/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Devlin 00870
05/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Devlin From the Belfast Newsletter dated 21st August 1915:
03/12/2018 Pte. Peter O'Neill Mrs O’Neill, Ballygillen, near Coagh, has just received intimation from the War Office that her husband, Private Peter O’Neill, of the 1st Inniskillings, was killed at the Dardanelles on 30th May. Private O’Neill had been a reservist, and served during the Boer War, but his time had expired before the present war broke out. He, however, patriotically volunteered for service again and went to the Dardanelles with his regiment. He leaves a widow and two children, a boy of five and a girl of two and a half years. His brother, Frank O’Neill, has also been killed in the western campaign. They are sons of Mr Joseph O’Neill, Ruskey, Coagh.
03/12/2018 Pte. Peter O'Neill 01667
03/12/2018 Pte. Peter O'Neill From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 21st August 1915: Private Peter O’Neill, Ballygillen
03/12/2018 Pte. Peter O'Neill O’NEILL – Private Peter, 12124, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, killed in action at the Dardanelles on 30th May; formerly of Ballygillan, Ballinderry Bridge. ‘O, Mother of Sorrows, Pray for him.’
03/12/2018 Pte. Peter O'Neill 01666
03/12/2018 Pte. Peter O'Neill From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 21st August 1915:
03/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 7th August 1915: Castledawson
03/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. McAnary and Irwin were both wounded shortly after landing at Gallipoli, and shortly after their heroic deed, Private Irwin was shot, the bullet lodging near the spine, making it’s extraction difficult. He is at present in hospital in Alexandria, and in a letter to his mother says that he is doing well, and that it may not be necessary to extract the bullet.
03/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. ‘In face of a very heavy fire these two men ran out of a trench and brought in a Royal Engineer officer who had been wounded in both legs and was unable to move. The officer’s life was saved by their action.’
03/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. To the Roll of Heroes which the war has made, must now be added the names of two Castledawson men. Privates MJ McAnary (No 9197) and Robert Irwin (No 9214), both of the 1st Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, have been recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Private McAnary is a brother of Mrs J Johnston, of the townland of Leitrim, and Private Irwin is a son of Mrs A Irwin, Hillhead. After giving particulars as to the dates and place (Gallipoli Peninsula), the official recommendation states:-
03/12/2018 Pte. Matthew James McAnary M.M. 01665
03/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. McAnary and Irwin were both wounded shortly after landing at Gallipoli, and shortly after their heroic deed, Private Irwin was shot, the bullet lodging near the spine, making it’s extraction difficult. He is at present in hospital in Alexandria, and in a letter to his mother says that he is doing well, and that it may not be necessary to extract the bullet.
03/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. ‘In face of a very heavy fire these two men ran out of a trench and brought in a Royal Engineer officer who had been wounded in both legs and was unable to move. The officer’s life was saved by their action.’
03/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. To the Roll of Heroes which the war has made, must now be added the names of two Castledawson men. Privates MJ McAnary (No 9197) and Robert Irwin (No 9214), both of the 1st Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, have been recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Private McAnary is a brother of Mrs J Johnston, of the townland of Leitrim, and Private Irwin is a son of Mrs A Irwin, Hillhead. After giving particulars as to the dates and place (Gallipoli Peninsula), the official recommendation states:-
03/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. 01665
03/12/2018 Pte. Robert Irwin M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 7th August 1915: Castledawson
03/12/2018 Pte. Patrick Corey 01664
03/12/2018 Pte. Patrick Corey Mrs Mary Corey, Blackhill, Cookstown, has received official intimation that her husband, Private Patrick Corey, Second Inniskillings, was killed in action on 22nd July. Private Corey was a reservist, and was called up at the beginning of the war. He went out with the First Expeditionary Force, and was present at the Battle of Mons. He was seriously wounded in October, and after a long term in hospital, was home on leave in January. On returning to the colours he was stationed in Londonderry and went out with a draft in May last. He was well-known and very popular in Cookstown, being a footballer of considerable ability, playing both the Association and Gaelic games. Much sympathy is felt for his young widow, who has received many letters of condolence, even from people with whom she had no personal acquaintance. She especially values the following:- ‘The King commands me to assure you of the true sympathy of his Majesty and the Queen in your sorrow. Kitchener.’
03/12/2018 Pte. Patrick Corey 01663
03/12/2018 Pte. Patrick Corey From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 7th August 1915: Private Patrick Corey
03/12/2018 Pte. Wesley C McClelland From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 14th August 1915: Herbert McClelland, Canadian Royal Engineers (brother of Wesley McClelland)
02/12/2018 Pte. Robert Henry Norris Private Norris came over to England with the first Canadian contingent. He got a few days leave during the time his regiment was in England, which he spent at home in Tamlaghtmore.
02/12/2018 Pte. Robert Henry Norris Robert Henry Norris emigrated to Canada around 1907.
02/12/2018 Pte. Robert Henry Norris Rev Louis W Moffett, Chaplain 2nd Infantry Brigade, also writes expressing deep sympathy with the relatives of the deceased, and states that he died from a bullet wound to the neck, and that he was buried with military honours and a religious service. Two empty cartridge cases used by the firing party over the grave are sent as mementos. J H Eakin, a comrade, also writes sending his condolences, of himself and ‘the rest of the boys who knew him’, and forwarding papers belonging to the deceased. The deceased was a member of L.O.L 198 and R.B.P. 518, Tamlaghtmore.
02/12/2018 Pte. Robert Henry Norris ‘Please allow me to extend to you my deepest sympathy in the loss of your son. At about 10.50 pm last night he was accompanying his comrades out of the trenches, of which I am in command, when a bullet hit him, and his death was almost instantaneous. The stretcher bearers were close behind, we did everything possible, but soon saw that our efforts were in vain. We buried him this afternoon at 6pm. His platoon formed the bearers and firing party, and the bugler sounded the Last Post. The grave is in a little cemetery with some of our other brave boys, and I am arranging to have a cross put up with his name and regiment on it. He died a good and brave Canadian soldier, and we are all proud to think that he died while doing his duty which we hope to continue until the allies are victorious.’
02/12/2018 Pte. Robert Henry Norris Mr John Stewart Norris, Tamlaghtmore, has received intimation that his son, Private R H Norris, was killed in action in Belgium on 21st July. Private Norris, who is the fourth son of his parents, emigrated to Canada about nine years ago, and was doing well. He volunteered at the beginning of the war, and came over to England with the first Canadian contingent. He got a few days leave during the time his regiment was in England, which he spent at home in Tamlaghtmore. Particulars of his death are given in a letter from Lieutenant Barton, who was in command of the platoon to which the deceased belonged. Writing on the 22nd to Mr Norris, he says:-
02/12/2018 Pte. Robert Henry Norris 01662
02/12/2018 Pte. Robert Henry Norris From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 31st July 1915: Private Thomas Henry Norris
02/12/2018 Pte. Robert Henry Norris Prior to active service he worked as a stoker before enlisting in the 7th Canadian Infantry on 7th November 1914 at Victoria, British Columbia.
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